Loving Heart Projects

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Conflict Busters

A Multi-Platform Interactive Multi-media Strategy Game

Helping Kids, Teens & Adults Learn & Practice

 Conflict Resolution

DEMO – TEXT

The Loving Heart Fellowship Presents

CONFLICT BUSTERS

 A Multi-Platform Interactive Multi-media Strategy Game

Helping Kids, Teens & Adults Learn & Practice

 Conflict Resolution

We change the Process of Learning into a

Entertaining Challenging Strategic Gaming Experience

 We Utilize Cutting Edge Educational Technologies and Teaching-Learning Methodologies

This initial DEMO is a simple basic sketch to give the viewer an idea of the GAME.

 

The game in its final form will be presented as follows:

  1. In an ENTERTAINING ANIMATION & VIDEO GAME FORMAT, (Educational Entertainment), with animation, video, audio and text.
  2. The script will be more complex, evoking thoughtfulness and emotional involvement
  3. There will be different versions of the GAME appropriate for different ages, including:

primary school aged children, teen-agers, and adults.

  1. There will be different versions of the GAME teaching different topics, skills and values.
  2. The presentation of GAME scenarios, questions, statements, missions, directives, and educational links will be interesting, personally relevant, thought provoking and entertaining.

 

The purpose of the following simulation is to give the viewer an understanding of the

FORMAT, PROCESS and Educational Content of the GAME.

 

The format of the GAME can be used to teach a variety of subjects, including:

  • Win-Win-Conflict Resolution (W-W-C-R )
  • Overcoming Prejudice
  • Elimination of Bullying
  • Stop Clique Groups from Outing Individuals
  • Cooperative Caring Relationship Building
  • Responding Appropriately to Peer Pressure
  • Inner Conflicts

 

In the Scenario presented here, the GAME process is used to illustrate how the GAME can facilitate:

  1. understanding of social principles
  2. acquisition of social skills
  3. learning to be an agent for positive change

 

This scenario addresses:

  • Cultural differences (values, expectations, judgments)
  • Stereotyping
  • Generalizing
  • Over-reaction
  • Aggression
  • Inner Conflict
  • Peer Pressure
  • Teasing & Provoking
  • Assuming

 

PLAYER or Classroom Teacher can choose which issues to PLAY, related to the GAME MISSION,

Or can let GAME randomly choose.

 

The GAME is created in PHASES from

  • Basic learning and understanding of principles of social behavior related to the issues listed above, to
  • Facilitating conflict resolution, and
  • Building cooperative relationships

 

PLAYER does not need to advance through all the PHASES.

 

 

Phase 1 – Presentation of the Scenario  (As ANIMATION or VIDEO)

 

Something happened during 6th grade recess on the playground.

 

A small group of 6th grade boys are standing and talking on the playground.

A couple of them are laughing and pointing to Dan, another 6th grade boy,

who is a new immigrant to Israel from California.

Dan is sitting in the corner of the playground holding his nose and crying.

 

Miriam, a friend of the boys of the group and of Dan, walks up to Dan and asks him,

“Why are you crying?”  

Dan answers, “I just got hit in the nose with a baseball, and I think my nose is broken, it really hurts.”

 

Miriam says to Dan, “Can I help you?”

At the same time, one of the boys in the group calls out Miriam,

“Leave him alone, he’s acting like a baby, let him grow up.”

Another says, “Come be with us.”

Some of the boys are pointing at Dan and laughing.

 

Miriam, looks conflicted, and leaves Dan and joins the group.

 

It was clear by Dan’s body language and facial expressions that he was upset about both the group’s and Miriam’s behavior.

Dan says to himself, “nobody cares about me”; “I hate them all”.

 

 


 

 

Phase 2 – Evaluation of the Situation – Intrapersonal dynamics and responses –

 

The GAME characters give the PLAYER an opportunity to evaluate and learn what is appropriate, inappropriate, desirable and undesirable, regarding the learning objectives and goals of the GAME.

 

  1. With respect to Dan

 

GAME SEQUENCE: 1

 

  1. Miriam says to the group,

“I really think you hurt Dan’s feelings.”

 

  1. Group member #1 says to Miriam,

              “Dan’s crying is not appropriate behavior for a 6th grade boy. Don’t you agree?”

 

  1. PLAYER AVATAR is given the options of choosing to answer:  Yes  or  No

 

  1. IF PLAYER RESPONDS – NO (by mouse clicking)
  2. GameScorer – adds point
  3. GAME continues

IF PLAYER RESPONDS – YES (by mouse clicking)

  1. GameScorer – subtracts points

 

  1. GAME provides corrective question:

Group member #2 says to PLAYER’ AVATAR:

             “Would it ever be O.K. for a kid in a lot of pain, maybe with a broken nose, to cry?”

 

  1. PLAYER answers.
    1. If PLAYER answers YES –
      1. GameScorer adds points, and the GAME CONTINUES
    2. If PLAYER answers NO –
      1. GameScorer – subtracts point,
      2. GAME sends PLAYER to AGL’s regarding the current principles

(AGL’s are After Game Links to sources and resources to give PLAYER additional information, understanding, and experiences regarding the relevant topics, e.g. questions asked, points of interest, items the PLAYER did not understand. AGL’s can be resources that we have created, or links to resources in print, on the web, YouTube, etc.)

  1.  Cultural differences,  values and prejudices regarding a boy or man crying when he is hurt or injured
  2. Assuming Dan is not really very hurt, maybe his nose was broken
  3. Stereotyping – boys who cry are babies or wimps
  4. Cultural value – males should not show their feelings
  1. After learning AGL’s, PLAYER begins game again.

 

 


 

 

GAME SEQUENCE: 2

 

  1. Group Member #3 says, “Dan said that nobody cares about him. I think he is wrong. What do you think?
  2. PLAYER AVATAR is given the options of responding: He is incorrect  or He is correct
  3. IF PLAYER RESPONDS – Incorrect
    1. GameScorer adds point
    2. GAME Continues

 

 

  1. If PLAYER RESPONDS – Dan was correct
  2. GameScorer – subtracts points
  3. GAME provides corrective question
  4. Didn’t some of us show concern for Dan’s feelings?
  5. GAME provides PLAYER AVATAR the options of choosing to answer:  Yes  or  No
  6. If YES – GameScorer – adds point and GAME continues
  7. If NO – GameScorer – subtracts point, and sends PLAYER to AGL’s regarding the current principle (see AGL’s below)
  8. After learning AGL’s, GAME presents Group Member #3, who says:

“So It seems Dan was wrong. Do you agree with me?”

  1. GAME and asks for response Yes No
  2. If YES – GameScorer – adds point and GAME continues
  3. If NO – GameScorer –
    1. subtracts points
    2. GAME remembers principals that were not learned, and provides list at end of GAME, with additional AGL’s (see AGL’s below)
  • PLAYER continues to next GAME SEQUENCE.

 

AGL examples for the above principle:

  1. Making generalizations and assumptions based on specific individuals or small groups;
  2. How to identify the feelings of others, through recognition and evaluation of speech, body language, etc.
  3. Do not judge, label or blame everyone, based on knowledge or personal experience of some people.
  4. What causes some individuals to behave differently than based on what they feel or believe (In this case Miriam was conflicted between empathy for Dan, and group acceptance)

 


 

 

GAME SEQUENCE 3

 

Question 3 – Another member (or GAME) says,

“Dan said I hate them all”, I don’t think it is o.k. to hate us just because his feelings are hurt.

Do you think it is O.K. that he HATES us?”

 

PLAYER chooses answer:  Yes     No

 

  1. IF PLAYER RESPONDS – NO
  2. GameScorer adds point
  3. Game continues
  4. IF PLAYER RESPONDS – YES
  5. GameScorer – subtracts points
  6. GAME provides corrective question: “Is it helpful or correct to feel negatively to everyone in a group, when only certain group members are doing something offensive or wrong?” Yes No
  7. PLAYER answers.
    1. If NO – GameScorer – adds point and GAME continues
    2. If YES – GameScorer – subtracts point, and sends PLAYER to AGL’s regarding the current principle (see AGL’s below)
    3. After learning AGL’s, GAME presents again Question #3, and asks for response Yes No
    4. If NO – GameScorer – adds point and GAME continues
    5. If YES – GameScorer –
      1. subtracts points
      2. GAME remembers principals that were not learned, and provides list at end of GAME, with additional AGL’s (see AGL’s below)
  • PLAYER continues to next Question.

 

AfterGameLinks – Links regarding consequences of hate for the person doing the hating, and for those being hated; and options to feeling and expressing hate.

For example:

  1. Hatred usually negatively affects the person doing the hate
  2. Hatred tends to make the situation worse for everybody
  3. Hatred often motivates destruction, and inappropriate or immoral behavior
  4. Instead of feeling hatred accept that the other is inappropriate
  5. Instead of expressing hatred, wish for the other to change positively
  6. Instead of acting out of hatred, help the other to change positively.

 


 

 

Question 4 – Another member (or GAME) says,

“It’s not all right that Dan is angry at all of us; only some of us laughed at him.

“Is it right to hate all of us?” 

 

PLAYER chooses answer:  Yes     No

 

  1. IF PLAYER RESPONDS – NO
  1. GameScorer adds point
  2. GAME continues
    1. IF PLAYER RESPONDS – YES
  3. GameScorer – subtracts points
  4. GAME provides corrective question: “Is it helpful or correct to feel negatively to everyone in a group, when only certain group members are doing something offensive or wrong?” Yes No
  5. PLAYER answers.
    1. If NO – GameScorer – adds point and GAME continues
    2. If YES – GameScorer – subtracts point, and sends PLAYER to AGL’s regarding the current principle (see AGL’s below)
    3. After learning AGL’s, GAME presents again Question #4, and asks for response Yes No
    4. If NO – GameScorer – adds point and GAME continues
    5. If YES – GameScorer –
      1. subtracts points
      2. GAME remembers principals that were not learned, and provides list at end of GAME, with additional AGL’s (see AGL’s below)
  • PLAYER continues to next Question.

 

AfterGameLinks – Links regarding consequences of GENERALIZATION, and ASSUMPTION

Examples:

  1. Each individual in a group do not always agree on all things
  2. It is important to see and evaluate each individual individually

 

 

 

 

  1. With respect to Miriam

 

Question 5 – Dan says to himself,

“I really don’t think it was nice for Miriam to leave me just because they asked her to.

If Miriam was really my friend she would not have left me.”

Dan asks PLAYER , “Do you think it was right that she left?”

 

PLAYER chooses answer – Yes  No

 

IF PLAYER RESPONDS – NO

  1. GameScorer adds points
  2. GAME continues

 

IF PLAYER RESPONDS – YES

  1. If YES – GameScorer – subtracts point,
  2. GAME provides corrective question: “Is it appropriate to ignore your values in order to be accepted by a particular group?” Yes   No
    1. If NO, GameScorer adds point and GAME continues
    2. If YES – GameScorer subtracts point, and sends PLAYER to AGL’s regarding current principle. (See AGL’s below)
  3. After learning AGL’s, GAME presents again Question #5, and asks for response Yes No
  4. If NO – GameScorer – adds point and GAME continues
  5. If YES – GameScorer –
    1. subtracts points
    2. GAME remembers principals that were not learned, and provides list at end of GAME, with additional AGL’s (see AGL’s below)
    3. PLAYER continues to next Question.

:

AfterGameLinks – Links regarding negative group dynamics and peer pressure.

For example:

  1. The need to be accepted by the group even if it requires going against your values
  2. Feeling embarrassed to be different
  3. Fear of rejection
  4. Options of responses in such a situation

 

 

  1. With respect to the group

Same process as above

 

Questions –SAMPLE ISSUES FOR QUESTIONS regarding:

  1. Group insensitivity
  2. Group aggressiveness and meanness
  3. Group apathy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THERE ARE 6 ADDITIONAL PHASES TO THE GAME

CONCLUDING WITH THE PLAYER INTERACTING WITH THE CHARACTERS OF THE SCENARIO TO

FACILITATE POSITIVE CHANGES OF ATTITUDES & BEHAVIORS

 

Additional Phases of GAME include:

 

 

Phase 3 – Identification of the Interpersonal Dynamics Dysfunctions

 

Phase 4 – PLAYER Identifies Likely Thoughts, Feelings and Dynamics of the Scenarios Characters

 

Phase 5 – PLAYER identifies dynamic issues which interfered with the characters experiencing Positive Relationship Dynamics and Behaviors, and/or caused Negative Relationship Dynamics and Behaviors

 

Phase 6 – PLAYER or Classroom Teacher Chooses Goals & Strategies of Building Positive Relationships – consistent with the Game Mission

 

Phase 7 – GAME asks PLAYER to evaluate optional strategies to achieve the above goals

 

Phase 8 – PLAYER interacts with characters

  1. PLAYER initiates facilitation of conflict resolution and relationship building with characters
  1. Providing information
  2. Asking questions
  3. Suggesting alternative ideas, feelings, and behaviors
    1. Characters respond (with a variety of possibilities)
    2. PLAYER continues to interact accordingly to guide characters to Game Learning Goals

 

 

Future Release

 

The Use of Game Theory in Conflict Resolution and Caring Win-Win Relationship Building

 

Flipped classroom & Blended Learning – The learner can play the GAME at home, thereby preparing for the class discussion, clarification, addition related learning activities, and more advanced learning.

Gamification – The GAME is designed to not only motivate engagement and learning, but to grow in relation to social skills, psychological understanding, and personal values clarification and development.

Informal learning – The game is designed to encourage informal learning a. while playing the GAME, b. during individual on-line follow-up learning experiences, and c. during the Classroom follow-up discussions and activities.

Interactive Learning Platform – The GAME has an interactive learning component for searching and receiving on-line learning resources

Differential Learning – The GAME is designed with

  1. Various options of play appropriate for the cognitive and social levels of the learner,

  2. A quiz to ascertain whether the learner processes, comprehends, and remembers more effectively and efficiently with visual or auditory material, and

  3. Resources and materials appropriate for the individual learner (based on N.LP).

Individualized Learning – Each player plays through a succession of advanced levels of GAME learning, and skill development, at his/her own pace.

Social Network Learning/Playing – Players can play together on the same team or on “opposing” different teams.

Multi-platform Technology and Accessibility – each student can play on a laptop, tablet, smartphone, or PC – individually, in a group, or as part of a social network.

Electronic Classroom – This GAME is particularly synergetic within an Electronic Classroom (Please refer to options for Play).

Compatible with different configurations of available technological devices – The Classroom Teacher or Player can choose a number of possible GAME playing-learning configurations based upon the technology available. (Tablets, laptops, home PC’s, – a few for the class, or one for each student).

Lifelong Learning – The social skills, interpersonal understanding, and development of values that is gained through the playing of this GAME, provides a platform and a jumping-up place for continued personal and social growth.

Fail-up – The Student/Player learns from the mistakes that are made, until the learner masters the knowledge, understanding and skills presented.

Adaptive Learning – The GAME adapts itself to the responses and understanding of the player.

Asynchronous, Synchronous and Combined Learning Options – This GAME offers the option of asynchronous learning, synchronous learning, or a combination of the two – asynchronous player self-learning, followed by classroom or social network learning experiences, integrating what has already been learned – with group sharing of ideas, skills, and social interaction regarding the material and process.

Synchronous & Asynchronous online Teacher monitoring and guidance – The GAME can be played online in the GAME’s web based format. Teachers and learners/players can synchronize a time for play and monitoring, so that the teacher can give feedback , explanations, clarifications and suggestions; or

The players/learners can interact with the teacher asynchronously.

Digital Story Telling – Animation is utilized within the GAME scenarios and in some of the provided teaching resources (AGL’s)

E-learning – takes place both through AGL’s (after GAME links) which connect the learner with additional resources and corrective presentations as a response to the materials that the learner had difficulty understanding.

MOOC – Massive Open Online Course – The information taught as part of the GAME playing experience can be presented formally, as a course, with the same availability of additional learning resources and teacher guidance.

Feel welcome to discuss with us any questions or comments that you may have regarding
how we can help you to utilize our programs.